All Things Green Man & The Traditional Jack-in-the-Green

Posts tagged “greenman

Featured Artist – Iris Compiet – Faeries of the Faultlines

I stumbled across Iris Compiet’s wonderful art a while back and was instantly mesmerised by her work and wanted to share it with our members and website visitors.

In Iris’s own words:

“I’m a traditional artist and Illustrator from the Netherlands. At the age of seven I knew exactly what I wanted to do when I grew up… paint and draw fantastical beings. I enjoy working on projects ranging from picture books to gallery art, concept art and even sculpting.

Storytelling is an essential part of my artwork, and as an artist I strive to lure in the spectator, to make them feel a connection to the work and open a gateway to their imagination to ignite it even further. I created a world called Faeries of the Faultlines. A glimpse into that world can be seen in a book with the same title. Drawing inspiration from European folklore, mythology, fairytales, ghost stories and anything from tombstones, Victorian photography to popular movies and music.

Let me tell you about Faeries, let me take you away on a journey, an adventure…

The Faultlines is an ancient name given to those places where the veil between This world and the Other is thinnest. It is the place where faeries dwell, creatures creep and magic oozes through the cracks. Recently the Faultlines have been stirring, opening up to all who wish to see and to all who dare to venture… “

Iris published the book Faeries of the Faultlines after getting it successfully funded through Kickstarter. It was so popular that it is now sold out. A new edition of the book will be released in September 2020. The secrets of the faultlines and beyond sketchbook is still available in Iris’s shop as are print sets, sticker sets, postcards and more – including the fantastic Greenman pin badge above – one of my new favourite Green Men! A perfect Yuletide gift for any green man hunter!

You can see more of Iris’s incredible art and visit her online shop at: www.eyeris.eu

Please note that Iris’s shop will be closed from 13th December until 13th January.


Carshalton Straw Jack

I’m extremely pleased to announce that the magical Carshalton Straw Jack paraded today. My thanks to Simon Webster for permission to use his wonderful picture. The Carshalton Jack is the 18th Jack to parade this year. I would love to learn a bit more about this unusual Jack and it’s history if any of the organisers or participants read this post.


Sighting – Crowland Abbey Green Man

Crowland Abbey Green Man © Tina Negus

Tina Negus sent me this wonderful image of the Green Man chancel boss at Crowland Abbey, Lincolnshire.

Crowland Abbey was a monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, It was founded in memory of St. Guthlac early in the eighth century by Ethelbald, King of Mercia, but was entirely destroyed and the community slaughtered by the Danes in 866.

Re founded in the reign of King Edred, it was destroyed by fire in 1091, but rebuilt about twenty years later by Abbot Joffrid. In 1170 the greater part of the abbey and church was once more burnt down and once more rebuilt, under Abbot Edward. From this time the history of Crowland was one of growing and almost unbroken prosperity down to the time of the Dissolution. Richly endowed by royal and noble visitors to the shrine of St. Guthlac, it became one of the most opulent of East Anglian abbeys; and owing to its isolated position in the heart of the fen country, its security and peace were comparatively undisturbed during the great civil wars and other national troubles.

At the time of the Dissolution the abbot was John Welles, or Bridges, who with his twenty-seven monks subscribed to the Royal Supremacy in 1534, and five years later surrendered his house to the king. The remains of the abbey were fortified by the Royalists in 1643, and besieged and taken by Cromwell in May of that year.

This Green Man is listed in our Gazetteer


Amanda Bates – Green Man & Lady

Amanda Bates is an artist, based in Kingsclere north Hampshire, with a growing interest in the tradition of the Green Man. One of the things to spark that interest was a chance visit to St. Peter’s in Upper Wolhampton, West Berkshire, where she found a delightful pair of Victorian Green Man stone carvings on the exterior of the church that were previously undiscovered.

Amanda didn’t have a camera with her so instead recorded them in pencil (above). Amanda then created the wonderful pictures accompanying this post using Acrylic Ink on rough watercolour paper, entitled Green Man & Green Lady.

Amanda wrote: “The faces are Victorian (the church was rebuilt in 1857) and, with their surroundings of leaves, the gentleman’s leafy moustache and the vegetation emerging from the lady’s mouth, are in the Green Man tradition. I fancy that they might represent the local landowner and his wife.”

My thanks to Amanda for getting in touch and sharing her incredible work with us. You can see more of Amanda’s work on her website: www.amandabatesart.co.uk  All pictures copyright © Amanda Bates


Jack in the Green 2016 Update

Fowlers Troop Jack-in-the-Green 2016 © Pixyledpublications

Fowlers Troop Jack-in-the-Green 2016 © Pixyledpublications

It’s been a great year for sightings of The Traditional Jack-in-the-Green across the UK. My thanks to everyone who has confirmed sightings and sent in some fantastic photographs. I’ll be posting plenty more pictures of this years Jacks in the weeks to come both here and on our Flickr Archive. The picture above of the Fowlers Troop/Deptford Jack in the Green was taken by Ross Parish and the picture below of the spectacular Hastings Jack in the Green was taken by Rose Blakeley.

I have now had confirmed sightings of the following 21 Jacks for 2016:

  • Bluebell Hill/Rochester Sweeps Jack-in-the-Green
  • Dead Horse Morris Jack-in-the-Green
  • Hammersmith Morris Jack-in-the-Green
  • Highworth Jack-in-the-Green
  • Oxford Jack-in-the-Green
  • Deptford/Fowlers Troop Jack-in-the-Green
  • Cheltenham Sweeps Jack-in-the-Green
  • Hastings Traditional Jack-in-the-Green
  • Whitstable Jack-in-the-Green
  • Ilfracombe Jack-in-the-Green
  • Winchcombe Jack-in-the-Green
  • Bristol Jack-in-the-Green
  • Knutsford Jack-in-the-Green
  • Guildford Jack-in-the-Green
  • Bovey Tracey/Grimspound Morris Jack-in-the-Green
  • Horsley Primary School (Stroud) Jack-in-the-Green
  • Hever Castle Jack-in-the-Green
  • Kentwell Hall Jack O’Green
  • Wythenshawe Hall Jack ‘O’ Green
  • Yaxley Jack-in-the-Green
  • Brentham May Day Jack-in-the-Green

You can find more detail about each Jack HERE

Whilst this blog remains our main method of communication Twitter has been a great source of information, photographs and videos of this years Jacks. I’ve been favouriting and retweeting over the past week from our Twitter account which you can find HERE

I would love to be able to gather photographs of all of this years Jacks for our free online Flickr archive. Please send any pictures via the ‘Contact Us’ tab at the top of the blog page. All pictures are always copyrighted to the original photographer.

If you haven’t seen a Jack-in-the-Green yet this year there is still at least one more to come. The Carshalton Straw Jack is a celebration of Harvest that takes place in September each year. The straw Jack is ritually stripped in the evening so that all present can take a keepsake and then he is burnt in a brazier. It is hoped that he will be burnt as a complete figure one year. The date for this event is still to be confirmed but you can visit the website here: Carshalton Straw Jack

There is also a possibility that a Jack will take part in the Pagan Pride Parade in central Nottingham on Sunday 7th August Pagan Pride Parade

Hastings Jack-in-the-Green 2016 © Rose Blakeley

Hastings Jack-in-the-Green 2016 © Rose Blakeley


GREEN(BANK) MAN

Whilst Flicking through Spark Magazine I came across this wonderful image created by the Bristol Based visual artist Tim Floyd for part of the Easton Arts Trail in 2011.

Commenting on this piece in his blog Tim wrote:

“On Saturday afternoon I headed over to Co-operation road in Greenbank and spray-painted an image of a Green Man on one of the bricked up doorways of the old Elizabeth Shaw chocolate factory. The foliage and berries of a Hawthorn tree are forming, and being disgorged by the character. I got my inspiration for this piece from images of traditional Green Man stone carvings and from a row of mature Hawthorne trees that form a border between the chocolate factory and the Bristol to Bath cycle path.

Tim commented to me:

“I’ve done a number of pieces which have been influenced by green man imagery. I work both in two and three dimensions creating pieces which respond to the cycles of nature, to the processes of decay and regeneration and to the relationships between human beings and the natural world –the image of the green man ties in perfectly with these themes.

To see more of Tim’s fantastic work visit his website at: www.timfloyd.co.uk


Happy New Year

Stafford St Mary's © Jennie Miller & Gary Truss

I would like to wish all our members a happy, healthy and prosperous 2012.

This wonderful picture was taken by Jennie Miller & Gary Truss and is from St Mary’s in Stafford


The Hidden Green Man in Essex

A new book about Green Men in Essex has just been published by Country Books.

DESCRIPTION

The medieval churches of Essex house one of history’s best kept secrets. They are frequently inhabited by a mysterious carving of an ancient male head, with foliage, usually oak leaves emerging from its mouth, ears, nose or eyes. He is surprisingly common in Essex, has many guises and is concealed in nooks, roofs, sometimes barely discernible on fonts, but may also be found lurking on roofs, walls, and hidden niches of churches.

I have one copy of the book hot off the press free to a good home all you have to do is e-mail me at greenman@virgin.net and on 21st December I will pull the name of the lucky winner out of the top hat. And the catch! well it’s only open to current members of The Company of the Green Man (except me and the author..sorry Susan!) and whoever wins it must be willing to write a review of the book and get it to me in time for our May/June e-newsletter.

If you want to buy your own copy in time for Christmas it’s available via Amazon.co.uk from our book shop for £7.99 just click on THIS LINK to visit the bookshop.


2012 Hasting Jack-in-the-Green

2012 is the 30th year of the revival of Jack in the Green in Hastings. To mark this the organisers are inviting all known Jacks, Green men, Bogies, Milkmaid Garlands and their entourages to join them next year for the celebration from 4th – 7th May 2012.
Jack will go out on Bank Holiday Monday May 7th. If you fall into one of the categories above please feel free to e-mail us at greenman@virgin.net and we’ll pass your details onto Keith Leech

New Green Man Sighting

Grave Slab in St Peters Church Northampton © Susan Doncaster

Suzie Doncaster has added this wonderful early green man to our current entry in the gazetteer for St Peter’s Church in Marefair Northampton. The finely carved Anglo Saxon grave slab dates to the 10-11th Century and shows beasts and birds entwined in some incredible foliage all sprouting from the mouth of  a Green Man. It is thought that the grave slab would have been in an earlier church that stood on the same site. The stone was found in a nearby ditch and was used as a door lintel and a mantel piece before finding its way back to the church.

The slab has been attributed to St Ragener an Anglo Saxon prince who was slain by the Vikings in 870. His grave had been forgotten until the mid 11th Century when visions of an elderley man drew a priest of Edward the Confessor to the burial site. Many miracles were said to have taken place at the church and the king had a shrine erected there decorated with gold, silver and precious stones. Sadly nothing of the great shrine remains.

Although the grave slab has been cut down by 3cm on one side the carving is remarkably intact and it is one of the erarliest carved stones in Northampton. St Peters Church is now a redundant Anglican Church and has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building, it is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. It is considered to be the most outstanding Norman church in the county.

Copyright © Susan Doncaster